How Private Is Your Online Activities?


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Today, it’s very easy to see information online. There’s so much you can put and there’s so much information everyone can see, but is that always safe?

First, the Appeals court is urged to strike down programs for collecting phone records. The National Security Agency’s program that collects and stores phone records are considered, “perhaps the biggest violation of freedom and constitutional rights in history.”

Even at Harvard University, there were secret cameras during lectures. Officials in the school had installed the cameras in lecture halls for a research program. The cameras took photos every minute and the program kept tabs on students and their attendance. It used computer software to analyze the pictures to see how many students attended lectures. In The Boston Globe, the program was revealed to have been kept from both students and teachers alike.

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Also, tech sites such as Google, Facebook, and Verizon can track online activities to create customize ads. Verizon Wireless is under fire for their ad-targeting program on its cellular network.  Two years ago, the advertisement program started. Jacob Hoffman-Andrews of the Electronic Frontier Foundation noticed the program and stated, “Verizon users might want to start looking for another provider,” in a blog post. “Indeed, while we’re concerned about Verizon’s own use of the header, we’re even more worried about what it allows others to find out about Verizon users.”

Verizon uses demographics and different interests, so if a certain website is looking for a target market, it’ll use ads and different site identifiers.

Regardless of what the situation is, having too much information about people and having that privilege broken, is a violation of privacy. Even if people are using it for research purposes, having information about people and spying is against what the Internet and using technology is for. Monitoring online activities and outside activities instigates investigations and unwanted complications.

 

-Sarah Mae Martin

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Sarah Mae

Sarah is currently a contributing writer for the Current Events column. She attends Ayala High School in Southern California. As a yearbook member, Sarah loves writing, photography, fashion, and graphic design. She is involved in volunteering at the local hospital and library as well as FBLA, Polynesian Club and Key Club. Follow her on Instagram! @sarahmae_martin